Building and Using Your Personal Information Network

So, last time I mentioned the importance of building your Personal Information Network or PIN (PS, thanks for the great comments – keep ‘em coming!). Today I’d like to share an example of how this can work in practice.

I woke up this morning and fired up Google Reader and Twitter first thing to see what I’d missed overnight (told you I was addicted). Found a Tweet from Chris Brogan, social media guru, with a link to an article on Twitter Best Practices at a blog I’d never heard of. I don’t know Chris, but I follow him as part of my PIN, to keep up with what’s happening in the world of social media. Chris is a particularly generous Twitterer and blogger, and so is a veritable fount of information. Trusting Chris’ insight, I clicked on the link which led to David Lee King’s blog and a gem of a post on “Twitter Best Practices So Far.” It’s a great post, with great tips like writing a great profile, making sure to say hi to people who follow you (PS, this is how you build community, folks), and even taking care to put up a background image on your Twitter homepage (the handsome devil on mine is my Second Life avatar, Ricetopher Freenote. Say Hi if you’re ever in-world). Please take the time to read and absorb David’s Twitter suggestions.

So, I read through David’s blog, really found his first few posts useful, so I added his blog’s rss feed to my Google Reader folder on Social Media. BANG! Another node in my Personal Information Network. I would have added David to my Twitter stream, but could not find his Twitter information. Lesson? Always make your Twitter address easy to find and add. PS, that’s how you build community, folks! At any rate, another valuable addition to my PIN.

As a bonus, David’s post included a link to a site I’d found and bookmarked before, but had forgotten: TwitterPacks. TwitterPacks is a great example of using a wiki to build a common knowledge base around a particular subject (yes, I promise to blog about effective use of wikis soon!), in this case, Twitter. It proposes the simple question: “If someone were joining Twitter today, who might they follow?” TwitterPacks is a collection of Twitter contacts, organized by subject area. So, if you wanted to find the Twitter contacts of people involved in education, social media, public media, etc, you could go the the appropriate page and find them, look at their Twitter stram, and then decide whether or not to add them to your PIN. A grassroots organization could build a similar wiki with Twitter contact info for their members organized by areas of interest, geography, etc. Check out Twitter Packs and start adding to your PIN today!

I hope you’ve found this follow up on how to build your PIN through Twitter to be helpful. If you have any other suggestions for how to build your PIN, won’t you please leave a comment and share the wealth with others? PS, that’s how you build community folks! :)

See you next time with more on potential uses of Twitter for activism.

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3 Comments

Filed under Activism, Microblogging, Social Media

3 responses to “Building and Using Your Personal Information Network

  1. Thanks for the kind words! And you’re right – completely spaced off my twitter address (twitter.com/davidleeking) – thanks for pointing that out (and adding it to my post right now)!

  2. I think that Twitter has been one of the most helpful tools for adding to my PIN. It provides more personal setting for your PIN to exist by setting up an easy way to meet new people before discovering someone’s del.icio.us/facebook/flickr account.

  3. Pingback: Top 8 Posts About Using Twitter to Build Your Brand | Brand-Yourself.com Blog

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